Notable legal developments

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User avatar 201.angrigator » Sun Sep 29, 2019 5:57 pm

I saw one blow up in a big ball of fire at a boy scout encampment. No one was in it, though.
Philmont?
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User avatar 202.Panamag8or » Sun Sep 29, 2019 7:18 pm

I saw one blow up in a big ball of fire at a boy scout encampment. No one was in it, though.
Philmont?
What?

It was at that ginormous mormon ranch east of Kissimmee.
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203.gatorbreeze » Sun Sep 29, 2019 7:25 pm



I saw one blow up in a big ball of fire at a boy scout encampment. No one was in it, though.
Philmont?
What?

It was at that ginormous mormon ranch east of Kissimmee.
Camp Baden Powell?
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Remember when you were young, broke and pissed off at the world? Well, you're older now.

User avatar 204.angrigator » Sun Sep 29, 2019 7:41 pm

Deseret Ranch. Philmont is in New Mexico.
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User avatar 205.Panamag8or » Sun Sep 29, 2019 11:59 pm



Philmont?
What?

It was at that ginormous mormon ranch east of Kissimmee.
Camp Baden Powell?
Baden Powell is in Melrose.
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User avatar 206.DocZaius » Wed Oct 02, 2019 12:05 am

R. Kelly's lawyer argues that it's cruel to leave him in jail pending trial because his girlfriends have to visit him one at a time:
https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/cri ... story.html
Last edited by DocZaius on Wed Oct 02, 2019 9:36 am, edited 1 time in total.
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User avatar 207.RIP » Wed Oct 02, 2019 12:38 am

Poor guy
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User avatar 209.RIP » Sat Oct 05, 2019 2:44 pm

Sweet Lord.
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210.evil gator » Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:20 pm

doc and supes, your thoughts on this?

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/9- ... spartanntp
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User avatar 211.DocZaius » Wed Oct 09, 2019 6:15 pm

doc and supes, your thoughts on this?

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/9- ... spartanntp
Hope they have some good evidence that the kid meant to kill. I mean, that's a really tough call to make - murder is an "adult" crime, but every once in a while you get a kid that's just a complete psycho. From the article it sounds to me like he's not being charged as an adult, so the worst that happens is he's on probation or locked up in juvie until he's 21.
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User avatar 212.DocZaius » Wed Oct 09, 2019 6:18 pm

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User avatar 213.DocZaius » Fri Oct 11, 2019 4:56 pm

I don't ordinarily advise non-lawyers to read court opinions, but this one by the 7th Circuit is something else:

http://media.ca7.uscourts.gov/cgi-bin/r ... 397044:S:0

tl;dr: Georgetown, Ind. man comes home to find his wife and two children killed. He’s detained for 13 years before he’s finally acquitted in a third trial. And this happens because the state lied about an ‘utterly unqualified’ assistant pretending to be a blood-spatter analyst. (The extent of his scientific training was a single chemistry class, which he flunked.) And there’s so, so much more. The state also lied about running a DNA test that could have exonerated the man. The second prosecutor was sanctioned for trying to cash in on a book deal. The first prosecutor ended up representing the real murderer. Click on the link, dear reader, for a shocking civil rights case that the Seventh Circuit is absolutely sending to trial.
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214.9508 » Fri Oct 11, 2019 4:58 pm

Fuck a duck
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User avatar 215.Panamag8or » Fri Oct 11, 2019 5:25 pm

That's fucked up. This guy needs to be heavily compensated.
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User avatar 216.anglo » Fri Oct 11, 2019 5:56 pm

Jesus. I sincerely hope that statute of limitations issue doesn't wind up protecting Stites, Englert, Faith, and Clemons. Those shitbags deserve the most severe consequences the law allows for conspiring to railroad an innocent man.
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User avatar 217.DocZaius » Wed Oct 16, 2019 10:07 pm

So Lee Boyd Malvo, the younger Beltway Sniper, is asking the Supreme Court to throw out his sentence of life-without-parole.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/crime-la ... sentenced/
After Cook’s slaying in Washington state, Malvo and Muhammad shot at least 21 more people around the country, killing 14 of them, including 10 homicides in the Washington area in a three-week rampage in October 2002. The shootings gripped the D.C. region and the world. The pair were arrested near Frederick, Md., and prosecuted in Virginia in 2003, where capital punishment was still an option for juveniles. Muhammad was sentenced to death, but Malvo’s jury chose a life sentence without parole rather than death for the Jamaican teen, who was 17 at the time of the sniper shootings. He then entered pleas in two additional Virginia shootings, and in six Maryland slayings, and received eight more life sentences.

Then the Supreme Court began a string of rulings that recognized the developing nature of teenage brains and changed the way juveniles are prosecuted. First in 2005, the court ruled that it was unconstitutional for juveniles to receive the death penalty, and in 2010 that juveniles may not receive life sentences for non-homicide convictions. Then in 2012, in Miller v. Alabama, the court ruled that juveniles may not be sentenced to life without parole unless they are found to be irreparably criminal. And in 2016, in Montgomery v. Louisiana, the court ruled that its Miller ruling could be applied to juvenile life sentences imposed years earlier.

“The distinctive attributes of youth,” Justice Elena Kagan wrote in Miller, “diminish the penological justifications for imposing the harshest sentences on juvenile offenders, even when they commit terrible crimes.” The ruling did not prohibit life sentences without parole, but required that judges or juries consider whether the crime “reflects unfortunate yet transient immaturity,” or the defendant is “the rare juvenile offender whose crime reflects irreparable corruption” deserving of the harshest penalty.
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218.evil gator » Thu Oct 17, 2019 1:38 pm

While this is a horrible crime, if you look at Malvo's life it was all horrible. He was "adopted" in very sketchy circumstances by a homicidal maniac. Is there any chance he wasn't being abused and brainwashed by the only person who took care of him? It's wildly tragic, but I'm not opposed to him staying behind bars.
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User avatar 219.DocZaius » Thu Oct 17, 2019 3:42 pm

While this is a horrible crime, if you look at Malvo's life it was all horrible. He was "adopted" in very sketchy circumstances by a homicidal maniac. Is there any chance he wasn't being abused and brainwashed by the only person who took care of him? It's wildly tragic, but I'm not opposed to him staying behind bars.
I moved to the D.C. area about six months before they started their sniping in D.C. It was pretty surreal - I found myself being hyper-alert any time I went outside. Filling my car up with gas was particularly nerve-wracking because you're pretty much standing still for several minutes and if I remember right, they targeted people at gas stations a couple times.

I feel like even though Mohammed clearly influenced Malvo and persuaded him to commit murder, I don't think he was "brainwashed" or otherwise didn't know right from wrong. He knew exactly what he was doing.

I mean, I kind of get what the Supreme Court is going for - no mandatory life without parole sentences for juvenile offenders - but this isn't exactly a great test case.
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