Active School Shooting in Florida

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76.Juggs » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:27 pm

1. abortions
2. media

any takers for the 3rd dumbest excuse?
You forgot. The FBI's was already blamed.
Liberals are already blaming Trump for not tightening up gun control
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77.MoralityULack » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:29 pm

He's Mexican you know.
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78.HG 2.0 » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:29 pm

1. abortions
2. media

any takers for the 3rd dumbest excuse?
You forgot. The FBI's was already blamed.
THEY DID NOTHING

Too focused on a presidential witch hunt and PEOPLE ARE DYING!!!
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79.9508 » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:40 pm

1. abortions
2. media

any takers for the 3rd dumbest excuse?
You forgot. The FBI's was already blamed.
Liberals are already blaming Trump for not tightening up gun control
Oh noes.....
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80.rampart » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:41 pm

1. abortions
2. media

any takers for the 3rd dumbest excuse?
You forgot. The FBI's was already blamed.
Liberals are already blaming Trump for not tightening up gun control
And cons are saying nows not the time to talk about gun control. Is anyone surprised by either side?
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User avatar 81.DocZaius » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:43 pm

1. abortions
2. media

any takers for the 3rd dumbest excuse?
Can't wait
He won't have anything useful to say, but there was a big part of the twitter-verse who were taking him to task for merely tweeting about the incident and not dropping everything right that minute to... do... something? Not sure what they wanted him to do.

I'm a fan of retaining gun rights in this country and I agree that we are going to keep seeing these kinds of incidents unless drastic (unconstitutional) measures are taken to restrict gun rights.

That said, I think I read somewhere that although the number of guns in circulation has gone up within the last couple of decades, the number of households who report having a gun in the house has gone down. I think in the past, more people actually had easy access to guns and yet we didn't see these kinds of spree shootings all that often.

So what has changed? While I think media attention plays a role, I don't think it's the only factor. Mental illness, sure - in some cases it's clear (like Sandy Hook and the Colorado theater), but in others it's not as obvious. Still, we've had crazy people as long as we've had people, and those same people have had virtually the same access to guns in 1950 as they do today.

There's something bigger in play here, and I mean in a cultural way. I'm not quite sure how to express it at the moment, but there's something that has changed in American culture that these spree killers are no longer inhibited from committing these atrocious acts. And no, it's not the election of Donald Trump (although that may be a symptom of the same cultural shift).

I have to think on it some more.
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User avatar 82.evs' Boytoy » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:45 pm

It's social media.
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User avatar 83.DocZaius » Thu Feb 15, 2018 2:47 pm

It's social media.
Also part of it. It's a lot easier to get "famous" now. Even if the media agrees to stop publishing the names of the shooters, the word will still get out.
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User avatar 84.ufgators68 » Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:11 pm

It's social media.
Speaking of... Apparently posting guns/posting pics of you posing with guns/posting pics of you posing with dead animals, means you are going to shoot up a school or something. Guess I should go delete my Facebook account.
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85.Juggs » Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:13 pm



Can't wait
He won't have anything useful to say, but there was a big part of the twitter-verse who were taking him to task for merely tweeting about the incident and not dropping everything right that minute to... do... something? Not sure what they wanted him to do.

I'm a fan of retaining gun rights in this country and I agree that we are going to keep seeing these kinds of incidents unless drastic (unconstitutional) measures are taken to restrict gun rights.

That said, I think I read somewhere that although the number of guns in circulation has gone up within the last couple of decades, the number of households who report having a gun in the house has gone down. I think in the past, more people actually had easy access to guns and yet we didn't see these kinds of spree shootings all that often.

So what has changed? While I think media attention plays a role, I don't think it's the only factor. Mental illness, sure - in some cases it's clear (like Sandy Hook and the Colorado theater), but in others it's not as obvious. Still, we've had crazy people as long as we've had people, and those same people have had virtually the same access to guns in 1950 as they do today.

There's something bigger in play here, and I mean in a cultural way. I'm not quite sure how to express it at the moment, but there's something that has changed in American culture that these spree killers are no longer inhibited from committing these atrocious acts. And no, it's not the election of Donald Trump (although that may be a symptom of the same cultural shift).

I have to think on it some more.
Well said.
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User avatar 86.Denver-Gator » Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:29 pm

It's social media.
Also part of it. It's a lot easier to get "famous" now. Even if the media agrees to stop publishing the names of the shooters, the word will still get out.
I also think it's how unencumbered people can be on social media. You can say things to people on social media, including places like this, that in the past people would never say to someones face. In some ways that's good, but in other ways it can be really bad especially with people going through a rough time or who have some sort of mental issue.
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87.MoralityULack » Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:31 pm

1. Video games - Most kids spend 80% of their spare time being judged on how many "people" they can kill.

2 Movies - Where the movie box office depends on the body count. Once it was a sensation when somebody was shot. Now 300-400 killed isn't worth watching.

3. Cop/crime shows - Dominate TV and all problems are solved in an exciting shootout. No clever nod of respsect from Loveless or Wo Fat or sad walk of embarrassment of the hippie in front of Joe Friday. Nope climactic shootout is the only resolution.

4. Guns with high magazine capacity - Allow shooters to increase the body count. Virtually non-existent when I was young. These are also consistent with the tools used in fantasy media mentioned above. This could have been mitigated in the 80s like automatic weapons were in the 20s. Not now. Too many out there.

5. The rise of a militaristic gun culture. It used be that people bought guns to go hunting. Tools for a practical useful purpose. A deer rifle and a 12 gauge and a .22. These might be positioned for defense in the house but it was a secondary practical purpose. There was no obsession with specs. You picked a .270 or .30-06 or .308 based on what the hardware store had in stock. Or you got your granddads .30-30. And IT REALLY DIDN'T MATTER. Now I bet sales of AR-15s and pistols dwarf shotguns with wood stocks. Because people buy them as part of their survivalist fantasies created by the above points and fed by a dozen magazines designed to tie in hardware to media and sell guns. Guns a hobby. A marketing bonanza...well until it got flooded with expensive toys that have little real world use other than to shoot up schools.

6. Lack of familiarity with the impact of guns. My dad held the forearm and I shot my first squirrel at 3. I was allowed to roam alone with guns at 10. I lived in the boonies. I didnt have much else to do. No video games. No TV. Catch a fish or shoot something. Most kids don't get any gun training. They shoot paper a time or two maybe. Not cute little rabbits just to watch them die. They dont get the consequences. Its just like a video. Points for you. Not twisting the head off of some poor creature to end its suffering.
Last edited by MoralityULack on Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:35 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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User avatar 88.Cus » Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:32 pm



Can't wait
He won't have anything useful to say, but there was a big part of the twitter-verse who were taking him to task for merely tweeting about the incident and not dropping everything right that minute to... do... something? Not sure what they wanted him to do.

I'm a fan of retaining gun rights in this country and I agree that we are going to keep seeing these kinds of incidents unless drastic (unconstitutional) measures are taken to restrict gun rights.

That said, I think I read somewhere that although the number of guns in circulation has gone up within the last couple of decades, the number of households who report having a gun in the house has gone down. I think in the past, more people actually had easy access to guns and yet we didn't see these kinds of spree shootings all that often.

So what has changed? While I think media attention plays a role, I don't think it's the only factor. Mental illness, sure - in some cases it's clear (like Sandy Hook and the Colorado theater), but in others it's not as obvious. Still, we've had crazy people as long as we've had people, and those same people have had virtually the same access to guns in 1950 as they do today.

There's something bigger in play here, and I mean in a cultural way. I'm not quite sure how to express it at the moment, but there's something that has changed in American culture that these spree killers are no longer inhibited from committing these atrocious acts. And no, it's not the election of Donald Trump (although that may be a symptom of the same cultural shift).

I have to think on it some more.
Well said.
Agree.
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89.HG 2.0 » Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:37 pm

And that’s only part of it ...as it’s sounding, kids knew about this ahead of time. Why did they not say anything? Are they waiting to Snapchat it live? Are they wanting to be the one with the viral feed?

It’s a dark path if si
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User avatar 90.Denver-Gator » Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:37 pm

1. Video games - Most kids spend 80% of their spare time being judged on how many "people" they can kill.

2 Movies - Where the movie box office depends on the body count. Once it was a sensation when somebody was shot. Now 300-400 killed isn't worth watching.

3. Cop/crime shows - Dominate TV and all problems are solved in an exciting shootout. No clever nod of respsect from Loveless or Wo Fat or sad walk of embarrassment of the hippie in front of Joe Friday. Nope climactic shootout is the only resolution.

4. Guns with high magazine capacity - Allow shooters to increase the body count. Virtually non-existent when I was young. These are also consistent with the tools used in fantasy media mentioned above. This could have been mitigated in the 80s like automatic weapons were in the 20s. Not now. Too many out there.

5. The rise of a militaristic gun culture. It used be that people bought guns to go hunting. Tools for a practical useful purpose. A deer rifle and a 12 gauge and a .22. These might be positioned for defense in the house but it was a secondary practical purpose. There was no obsession with specs. You picked a .270 or .30-06 or .308 based on what the hardware store had in stock. Or you got your granddads .30-30. And IT REALLY DIDN'T MATTER. Now I bet sales of AR-15s and pistols dwarf shotguns with wood stocks. Because people buy them as part of their survivalist fantasies created by the above points and fed by a dozen magazines designed to tie in hardware to media and sell guns. Guns a hobby. A marketing bonanza...well until it got flooded with expensive toys that have little real world use other than to shoot up schools.

6. Lack of familiarity with the impact of guns. My dad held the forearm and I shot my first squirrel at 3. I was allowed to roam alone with guns at 10. I lived in the boonies. I didnt have much else to do. No video games. No TV. Catch a fish or shoot something. Most kids don't get any gun training. They shoot paper. Not cute little rabbits just to watch them die. They dont get the consequences. Its just like a video. Points for you. Not twisting the head of of some poor creature to end its suffering.
In my post I didn't put this much thought into it, but I pretty much agree.

#6 is true for me too. Maybe I was a little older than 3, but we had guns for hunting in the house all the time. I learned to shoot and respect guns at a young age, hunted with my dad throughout my youth. The first time I shot with anything bigger than a bb gun, was a beer can full of water to demonstrate how dangerous a bullet was hitting a human body, a relatively simple but effective analogy for a young kid.
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91.Juggs » Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:37 pm

My dad held the forearm and I shot my first squirrel at 3.
Stop this shit. No you didn't. There is absolutely no way a 3 year old can aim a rifle and hit a squirrel, even with dad holding your forearm. It's fucking nonsense.
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92.MoralityULack » Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:45 pm

My dad held the forearm and I shot my first squirrel at 3.
Stop this shit. No you didn't. There is absolutely no way a 3 year old can aim a rifle and hit a squirrel, even with dad holding your forearm. It's fucking nonsense.
Nope. Fact. He was in the fork of a tree in our back yard about 30-40 feet away. My dad held the forearm like it was a mounted machine gun. I took forever aiming. I closed my eyes when I pulled the trigger (because a .22 is a big bang to a 3 year old) and he was gone. I thought he ran off. My dad took me around back of the tree and there he was.

One of my earliest if not THE earliest memory.
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93.evil gator » Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:49 pm

ahaha good lord
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User avatar 94.evs' Boytoy » Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:55 pm

Did you eat its heart? You're supposed to eat the heart of your first kill. I'm guessing you did and now the spirit of the squirrel lives in you......which explains being squirrel brained.
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User avatar 95.evs' Boytoy » Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:56 pm

Scott talking about people with mental illness not having access to guns......didn't Trump remove some Obama thing that did just that?
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96.Juggs » Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:58 pm

Did you eat its heart? You're supposed to eat the heart of your first kill. I'm guessing you did and now the spirit of the squirrel lives in you......which explains being squirrel brained.
hahahaha
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97.MoralityULack » Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:59 pm

Did you eat its heart? You're supposed to eat the heart of your first kill. I'm guessing you did and now the spirit of the squirrel lives in you......which explains being squirrel brained.
Yeah, I don't think so. I think we just buried it
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98.HG 2.0 » Thu Feb 15, 2018 3:59 pm

Scott talking about people with mental illness not having access to guns......didn't Trump remove some Obama thing that did just that?
No what obama did was mandate medical records accessible through the National Background check program. Giving access to mental health records, in my opinion, is a huge breach of privacy

Trump reversed that portion
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99.Juggs » Thu Feb 15, 2018 4:02 pm

Scott talking about people with mental illness not having access to guns......didn't Trump remove some Obama thing that did just that?
No what obama did was mandate medical records accessible through the National Background check program. Giving access to mental health records, in my opinion, is a huge breach of privacy

Trump reversed that portion
Yep. Rightly so.
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User avatar 100.Denver-Gator » Thu Feb 15, 2018 4:03 pm

My dad held the forearm and I shot my first squirrel at 3.
Stop this shit. No you didn't. There is absolutely no way a 3 year old can aim a rifle and hit a squirrel, even with dad holding your forearm. It's fucking nonsense.
Nope. Fact. He was in the fork of a tree in our back yard about 30-40 feet away. My dad held the forearm like it was a mounted machine gun. I took forever aiming. I closed my eyes when I pulled the trigger (because a .22 is a big bang to a 3 year old) and he was gone. I thought he ran off. My dad took me around back of the tree and there he was.

One of my earliest if not THE earliest memory.
Honestly, I don't doubt this story. At our hunting camp in the Big Cypress when I was a kid, plenty of the people we ran into and were friends with at other camps out there that would have done this kind of thing with their kids at a young age.
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